Press

Youth renovate derelict North End building

Courtesy of CBC News After more than 10 years sitting vacant, a derelict building on Winnipeg’s Powers Street is nearly ready to be lived in. The major makeover is thanks to a group of inner-city youth who dedicated their time to rebuilding the structure and learning a trade at the same time. Inner City Youth Alive, a faith-based organization, bought the eye-sore from the City of Winnipeg for $2, on the condition they would train youth in home renovation skills and convert it into low-income housing. That plan came to fruition Wednesday. Kent Dueck, the organization’s founder, said the project helped more than a dozen teens get job-relevant training. “There’s 13 different youth that were involved and were actually able to get some training and learn some basic skills to bolster their resume and give them a chance,” said Dueck. The group of 13 had to gut the entire building and start from scratch. “It was just another boarded up home in our community,” said Dueck. George Grouette was one of the first young people to sign up for the rebuild. He said before the renovation, the building was “crap. You didn’t want to walk in.” Now, the finishing touches are nearly in place, and the North End property will soon be move-in ready. “You get to make a little bit of money, and you also get to help other people out. I think that goes hand in hand,” said 20-year-old Grouette. The home will be available for viewing at an open house scheduled for Thursday. When the project is completed, the house will go on the market to get seed money for the organization’s next renovation project. + Click to watch a video report on the...

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Inner city youth group restores formerly derelict home

Courtesy of CTV News Winnipeg Two years ago, Inner City Youth Alive bought a derelict home on Powers Street from the city for $2. Now, the group has helped restore the home, with youths working alongside trained professionals to renovate and upgrade the structure, which was previously boarded up for a decade. The home was shown off at an event on Thursday. The project was used to help develop skills in young people from the neighbourhood, said officials. With the help of trained professionals, young adults were taught the skills of the trade. “We did all the flooring, then the doors,” said Jeremy Soldad, who worked on the house. Part of the Inner City Youth Alive’s mandate is to empower and develop skills in unemployed young people. + Click to watch a video report on the...

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Building citizens one home at a time

Written by Randy Turner, courtesy of Winnipeg Free Press Jeremy Soldat stole cars. He was good at it, too. Now, the 20-year-old, who walked out of jail last year and vowed never to return, wants to rebuild his past. One house at a time, if necessary. “People used to ask me all the time where I was going to be in five years,” Soldat said. “I never knew the answer. Now I know.” Soldat was part of a crew of 13 members of Inner City Youth Alive that turned a two-buck house on Powers Street, along Redwood Avenue, into a home that could fetch $140,000 on the market. Now, Soldat wants to renovate another one. So does ICYA. “We have an eye on another property in the community,” said Kent Dueck, the founder of the faith-based organization, sponsored primarily by a wide range of churches. “We’re hoping this can just keep rolling.” Dueck’s group bought the house for $2 from the city almost two years ago, when it was an abandoned rat-trap where squatters lit fires inside to keep warm. The place was coated in pigeon dung. Recalled Dueck: “Ugh. It was disgusting.” Some people in the construction industry said Dueck would be better off taking a wrecking ball to the place. But the symbolism of restoring the existing home mirrored the group’s philosophy toward the 900 youth and young adults that are affiliated with ICYA programs, first incorporated in 1990. “Let’s work with what we’ve got,” Dueck decided. “You can take the old and the derelict and turn it around.” Turns out, the young and the derelict can get renovated, too. Soldat was hired by ICYA for the renovation job about six months ago. He’d just left Milner Ridge Correctional Centre after a 19-month stretch — the latest incarceration since his first brush with the law as a 12-year-old. By 15, Soldat was infamous for car thefts. He couldn’t tell you how many he stole. Crown attorneys could, though. But after Milner Ridge, Soldat vowed to stay clean. “I just told myself I wanted to be done with...

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$2 house gets new lease on life

Written by Dave Baxter, courtesy of Metro Winnipeg Youth from an inner city youth program have completely renovated a derelict house in Winnipeg’s North End that had been boarded up for over 10 years. The house at 286 Powers St, was bought by Inner City Youth Alive from the city for $2 in 2011, and used as a construction program for unemployed youth ages 19-30. The project was used to help youth get work experience and also help revitalize the area. “It just feels good to see our hard work pay off and to see how many people have come by today to see the house,” said Jeremy Soldat, 20, who worked on the project with a crew of about 13 guys. Kent Dueck, executive director of Inner City Youth Alive, said the house was an eyesore before the organization got their hands on it. “It was just gross”, said Dueck. “Birds were getting in through the top windows. Pigeons were in here. There was a fire in the kitchen and smoke damage throughout the building and you could see the remnants of squatters.” “It has been completely...

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Video: Global Winnipeg, Cold Calculations Part 1, A look at crime and violence

Courtesy of Global Winnipeg Part 1 of Global Winnipeg’s investigative series Cold Calculations looks at communities within the city all too familiar with crime and violence. Megan Batchelor reports. Click here to watch the video on Global Winnipeg’s...

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Winnipeg Jets True North Foundation Donates to 44 Local Children's Charities

Article courtesy of Winnipeg Jets and NHL.com Network On June 18, 2012, the Winnipeg Jets True North Foundation was proud to announce the donation of $1,015,708 to 44 local children’s charities across Manitoba. The True North Foundation serves as the entity through which The Winnipeg Jets Hockey Club performs its philanthropic responsibilities to the Province of Manitoba. It fulfills this obligation by supporting registered charities within our community who focus on the youth of our province and by developing and operating programs that serve disadvantaged kids. Close to one hundred charities applied to receive funding from the True North Foundation, and 44 were carefully selected. “We went through the process of reviewing all of the applications,” said Mark Chipman, Chairman & Governor of True North Sports & Entertainment. “There are so many great causes and we tried to help as many as we could that fit our criteria. As you read through some of the stories and go through this, it’s a long process but it’s worth it because you get to see the incredible work that’s being done in our community, very quietly. “We’ve been a quiet foundation for the past 15 years. Now we can be a little more outward with our intentions in what we can do. What we do is support all these wonderful causes that don’t get the opportunity to have their stories told or get the support they deserve.” Money for the foundation is raised through 50/50 sales at all Winnipeg Jets home games, the sale of Jets License Plates, the Mike Keane Celebrity Hockey Classic, the Ranger Golf Tournament along with various donations and third party events. “To reach over the million dollar mark in monies donated to charities is a great accomplishment for the Winnipeg Jets True North Foundation,” stated foundation Executive Director Dwayne Green. “This would not be possible without the generosity of those who support our fundraising activities, our event sponsors, our passionate fans and all our volunteers and our internal staff and management who get behind all of our events. They are the reason we are able to...

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